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Muscat 18-20 May 2014 KPI Professional Certification

Posted on 03 March 2014

DateCityCountry
Sun, 2014-05-18 - Tue, 2014-05-20 Muscat Oman
When: 
Sun, 2014-05-18 - Tue, 2014-05-20
Trainer name: 
Adrian Brudan
Organiser: 
The KPI Institute

KPI Professional Certification

This certification course trains participants in how to establish and work with KPIs and offers them the opportunity to get certified on the ability to deploy and use KPIs in accordance with The KPI Institute's Key Performance Indicators Management Framework, the main body of knowledge on the rigorous use of KPIs in business. In order to obtain the certification there is a mandatory three-day course at the end of which participants will take an exam. By completing this course participants will gain both theoretical understanding and practical experience of using a variety of performance management tools and techniques for KPI management.

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Singapore 15-17 April 2014 KPI Professional Certification

Posted on 03 March 2014

DateCityCountry
Tue, 2014-04-15 - Thu, 2014-04-17 Singapore Singapore
When: 
Tue, 2014-04-15 - Thu, 2014-04-17
Trainer name: 
Aurel Brudan
Organiser: 
The KPI Institute

General Presentation 

The KPI Institute has announced the dates for its next KPI certification training course taking place in Singapore, Singapore: 15-17 April 2014.

The course offers participants the opportunity to get certified on the ability to deploy and use KPIs in accordance with The KPI Institute’s Key Performance Indicators Management Framework, the main body of knowledge on the rigorous use of KPIs in business.

This KPI training course is designed to provide a strong foundation to deploying business management systems and BI software by developing the next generation of KPI professionals. These KPI specialists will become the go-to place for advice around understanding, establishing, activating, reporting and generating value by using KPI across organizations. By completing the course, participants will gain both the theoretical understanding and practical experience of using a variety of performance management tools and techniques for KPI management.

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Istanbul 2-4 April 2014 KPI Professional Certification

Posted on 03 March 2014

DateCityCountry
Wed, 2014-04-02 - Fri, 2014-04-04 Istanbul Turkey
When: 
Wed, 2014-04-02 - Fri, 2014-04-04
Trainer name: 
Adrian Brudan
Organiser: 
The KPI Institute

General Presentation 

The KPI Institute has announced the dates for its next KPI certification training course taking place in IstanbulTurkey: 2-4 April 2014. The course offers participants the opportunity to get certified on the ability to deploy and use KPIs in accordance with The KPI Institute’s Key Performance Indicators Management Framework, the main body of knowledge on the rigorous use of KPIs in business.

This KPI training course is designed to provide a strong foundation to deploying business management systems and BI software by developing the next generation of KPI professionals. These KPI specialists will become the go-to place for advice around understanding, establishing, activating, reporting and generating value by using KPI across organizations. By completing the course, participants will gain both the theoretical understanding and practical experience of using a variety of performance management tools and techniques for KPI management.

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Bucharest 2-4 April 2014 KPI Professional Certification

Posted on 03 March 2014

DateCityCountry
Wed, 2014-04-02 - Fri, 2014-04-04 Bucharest Romania
When: 
Wed, 2014-04-02 - Fri, 2014-04-04
Trainer name: 
Mihai Toma
Organiser: 
The KPI Institute

General Presentation 

The KPI Institute has announced the dates for its next KPI certification training course taking place in Bucharest, Romania: 2- 4 April 2014.

The course offers participants the opportunity to get certified on the ability to deploy and use KPIs in accordance with The KPI Institute’s Key Performance Indicators Management Framework, the main body of knowledge on the rigorous use of KPIs in business.

This KPI training course is designed to provide a strong foundation to deploying business management systems and BI software by developing the next generation of KPI professionals. These KPI specialists will become the go-to place for advice around understanding, establishing, activating, reporting and generating value by using KPI across organizations. By completing the course, participants will gain both the theoretical understanding and practical experience of using a variety of performance management tools and techniques for KPI management.

Participant Certification

Participants will be pre-tested by using a multiple choice questionnaire at the beginning of each session. On Day 3, delegates can opt in to attend a final test to obtain the Certified KPI Professional Certification from The KPI Institute.

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Dresner’s Point: Don’t Overlook the Zigzagging of Collaboration & Text Analytics

Posted on 11 February 2014

Missed the boat. Didn’t gather enough steam. All that glitters isn’t gold. These pronouncements are often the verdict when technology evolves quickly and some functionalities or features don’t grab a strong enough hold quickly enough in the market. But applying that verdict to collaboration BI as well as social media and text analytics would be a mistake, even though they haven’t met expectations.

Collaboration BI
At one of my weekly #BIWisdom tweetchats this month, collaboration, social media and text analytics turned up in a discussion about 2013 BI predictions that didn’t pan out.

Perspectives on Performance - Volume 11 Issue 1

Posted on 21 January 2014

The latest newsletter from the PMA is now available. It includes details of submitting abstracts to PMA 2014 - the deadline is 31 January, as well as a report of the PMAA Confernce. The full contents for Volume 10, Issue 2 are:

  • Getting Alignment Right: There’s More at Stake Than You Think
  • Triple ‘P’ Approach (Power, Performance and Precision) and Supply Chain Management
  • The Bad Performance Measurement Habits 
  • PMAA 
  • Australasia Conference Report
  • Hoshin Kanri through the eyes of English Language Texts
  • Improving Performance by Predicting and Diagnosing Chances of Failure 
  • PMA 2014 Abstract Submission Details

We hope you enjoy this issue.  The deadline for the next issue is 31 March 2014.  Please send submissions to newsletter@performanceportal.org

 

Dresner’s Point: Ready for the “2014ization” of Business Intelligence?

Posted on 21 January 2014

I don’t like making predictions, so rest assured this is not another of a myriad of predictions articles that hit the media annually. Instead, let’s kick start the year with some definite plans and aspirations of companies in the business intelligence sphere. A great place for an insightful, real-world view of BI trends is my weekly #BIWisdom tweetchats with BI customers, vendors and consultants.

What is your organization planning to try to achieve in 2014? When I recently asked the #BIWisdom tribe this question, their tweets made it immediately clear that their companies are gearing up for achieving even greater value from business intelligence than they have to date.

Plans Include:

• More mobile BI
• More BI demos with real-life applications
• Get more into mobile BI as it helps to reach the masses and get closer to “Information Democracy”
• Explore the sharing potential of BI and the power to integrate additional sources at any point in the BI stack
• BI methodology is big on our checklist for this year
• Get up to speed with some of the specialized tools in the BI stack; it’s hard to keep up with the toolsets released so far for data integration, data quality, data management and data security
• Migrating to current versions of BI software; for innovations in BI software you need the newest versions. Examples: user empowerment and the speed of getting answers (not just reports)
• There is a growing interest in data that tells stories; keep up with advances in storyboarding to package visual analytics that might fill some gaps in communication and collaboration
• Monitor rumblings about trend to shift data to secure storage outside the U.S. due to the NSA revelations

Dresner’s Point: Why do Some BI Sprouts Lead to Failure?

Posted on 06 January 2014

Over the years of conducting our Wisdom of Crowds® Business Intelligence Market Study on various aspects of BI the percentage of respondents that report success with their BI initiatives increases each time. Yet there are still some that report failures.

Success begets even more success, of course. What enables an outcome of “mission accomplished” and what causes failures? This has been a topic of debates several times in our Friday #BIWisdom tweetchats.
Our market studies consistently reveal that key contributors to success are management commitment, organizational stability, focused implementation and requisite skills. So it follows that the opposite characteristics would lead to failure: lack of management commitment, unstable organization and lack of skills.

But my #BIWisdom tweetchat participants have expanded that picture with their real-world experiences as users, vendors and consultants. In our debates, they swept past the key characteristics and honed in on a central issue — How do organizations decide that a BI implementation failed?

Is the deciding factor that the company does poorly, or that the users are dissatisfied, or is it a combination of both factors? And what constitutes a “user” in this aspect; is it only users with decision authority? Is the deciding factor among end users the fact that vendors say the technology answers problems all on its own and thus there is not enough emphasis on process, training, briefings, change management? Is it the lack of a long-term vision and commitment, which then causes the BI solution to go stale and subsequently be perceived as a failure?

Failure is a relevant term; in some organizations the IT department may say the BI initiative is a success but end users say it’s a failure because they can’t use the tool.

Dresner’s Point: Does BI Need a Seducing Effect?

Posted on 14 December 2013

I guess Black Friday, January sales and constant reminders of how many shopping days are left before Christmas weren’t enough enough to entice shoppers to hit the stores early and often enough in the holiday season. Now we even have Pre-Black Friday and Green Monday. These seductive tactics to entice people with something “special” reminded me of a discussion we had at one my Friday #BIWisdom tweetchats.

When I asked my Twitter group of BI enthusiasts what would help to rein in more users, it was apparent that they thought more self-service functionality is needed in BI apps. They agreed that vendors have made great strides in self-service BI (SSBI) but also agreed that vendors need to extend SSBI to advanced analytics.
The weekly #BIWisdom tweetchat is my favorite forum for BI discussions because it brings out varying perspectives among users, vendors and consultants and thus usually bubbles up effective real-world ideas. In the following tweets you can see how they painted decision making for improving the SSBI environment:
Should we “dummy down” advanced analytics for end users?

• No matter how good the information is, if a tool is too complex for end users, they won’t use it. They’ll take the path of least resistance. The more BI practitioners hide the complexity, the more users will think it’s easy.
• Complexity can be hidden behind well-designed semantic layers.
• Users want things simple and want what they’re accustomed to daily: Twitter, Google, Apple. And Twitter encourages over-simplification.

Should we train and educate the users better?

• Some tools require near-zero training to use. Pain comes from not understanding the data.

Dresner’s Point: How to Move the Needle in User Adoption

Posted on 14 December 2013

The topic of how to increase user adoption of business intelligence technologies generated a lot of opinions in a recent Friday #BIWisdom tweetchat.

The tweets started with opinions about what hampers user adoption. Some tweeted that the tangling of BI into the Big Data space causes confusion, it’s a mistake to try to get end users to adopt “analyst tools” and we must stop force-feeding generic analysis tools to end users even if they are “simple” to use. Someone tweeted that some organizations make the mistake of working only with power users who may have a vested interest in not expanding adoption to others. Many agreed that trying to change a user’s adoption of and interaction with BI tools on a daily basis is difficult; one tweet compared it to trying to change someone’s religion or belief system.

The conversation turned when a #BIWisdom tribe member stated that “BI encompasses people, process and technology; but most implementations focus on the technology and forget the people and process.” Others then chimed in with:

• BI should just be intuitive and just a part of other apps; users don’t want to think about doing BI
• Predictive analytics adds a lot of value; but it needs to be a part of users’ current desktop app, not a separate app
• Analytics should be placed inside business processes and link to actions rather than making users go to another system
• BI solutions should not be approached from a one-size-fits-all mindset